Freaks of Nature - Netflix

Freaks of Nature takes viewers around the globe to meet an elite group of people who have the ability to control, manipulate or conquer nature; performing feats that could harm or kill the average human. They may brave sub-zero temps in just a pair of shorts, pass electricity through their body and out their fingertips in a bolt of lightning, set themselves on fire claiming to be fireproof, and fly like a human-bird at speeds more than 100 mph. Show host Tyler Harcott ("Junkyard Wars") even puts himself in some of these incredible situations to see how a "normal" human can withstand them.

Freaks of Nature - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2013-11-24

Freaks of Nature - Freak show - Netflix

A freak show is an exhibition of biological rarities, referred to in popular culture as “freaks of nature”. Typical features would be physically unusual humans, such as those uncommonly large or small, those with both male and female secondary sexual characteristics, people with other extraordinary diseases and conditions, and performances that are expected to be shocking to the viewers. Heavily tattooed or pierced people have sometimes been seen in freak shows, as have attention-getting physical performers such as fire-eating and sword-swallowing acts.

Freaks of Nature - Tom Norman - Netflix

Barnum's English counterpart was Tom Norman, a renowned Victorian showman, whose traveling exhibitions featured Eliza Jenkins, the “Skeleton Woman”, a “Balloon Headed Baby” and a woman who bit off the heads of live rats—the “most gruesome” act Norman claimed to have seen. Other acts included fleas, fat ladies, giants, dwarves and retired white seamen, painted black and speaking in an invented language, billed “savage Zulus”. He displayed a “family of midgets” which in reality was composed of two men and a borrowed baby. He operated a number of shops in London and Nottingham, and exhibited travelling shows throughout the country. Most famously, in 1884, Norman came into contact with Joseph Merrick, sometimes called “the Elephant Man”, a young man from Leicester who suffered from extreme deformities. Merrick arrived in London and into Norman's care. Norman, initially shocked by Merrick's appearance and reluctant to display him, nonetheless exhibited him at his penny gaff shop at 123 Whitechapel Road, directly across the road from the London Hospital. Because of its proximity to the hospital, the shop received medical students and doctors as visitors. One of these was a young surgeon named Frederick Treves who arranged to have Merrick brought to the hospital to be examined. The exhibition of the Elephant Man was reasonably successful, particularly with the added income from a printed pamphlet about Merrick's life and condition. At this time, however, public opinion about freak shows was starting to change and the display of human novelties was beginning to be viewed as distasteful. After only a few weeks with Norman, the Elephant Man exhibition was shut down by the police, and Norman and Merrick parted ways. Treves later arranged for Merrick to live at the London Hospital until his death in 1890. In Treves' 1923 memoir, The Elephant Man and Other Reminiscences made Norman infamous as a drunk who cruelly exploited Merrick. Norman counteracted these claims in a letter in the World's Fair newspaper that year, as well as his own autobiography. Norman's opinion was that he provided Merrick (and his other exhibits) a way of making a living and remaining independent, but that on entering the London Hospital, Merrick remained a freak on display, only with no control over how or when he was viewed.

Freaks of Nature - References - Netflix

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